Useful Websites for Genetic Information

We are frequently asked to provide information and resources in genetics for students, instructors and the community. A good place to learn more about genetic conditions, issues, and additional topics is the Internet. The following are a few sites which I find very useful as instructional tools.

A wealth of general information can be found at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Information site, http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources, which provides current news on a variety of science topics, research, and educational resources. General information specifically in the field of genetics can be found on the University of Utah website, http://gslc.genetics.utah.edu. This site features a series of instructional blocks including a reference series, a genomics series, and the genetics of health series. For information in the categories of health, educational resources, policies and ethics, and careers, you may visit the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) site at http://www.genome.gov. This site features a talking glossary, tutorials, fact sheets, and information about the Human Genome Project. The Genetics Education Center at the University of Kansas Medical Center, http://www.kumc.edu/gec, is a wonderful website to assist teachers and students in obtaining current information on genetics, lesson plan ideas, and networking links to numerous other sites and education programs.

Careers in genetics are diverse and depending on the area of specialty, have varying educational requirements. An excellent source of information on genetic careers is the genetic professionals’ website at http://genetics.faseb.org/genetics/gsa/careers/bro-01.htm. Here you will find job descriptions and educational requirements for genetic researchers, clinical geneticists, counselors, and laboratory geneticists. Another very useful website is from the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) at www.genednet.org/pages/career_training.shtml.

We receive many questions about specific genetic disorders from both students and families seeking information and support. The National Library of Medicine has an excellent and friendly site at http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov from which to locate much information on many genetic conditions. The Family Village is a very useful site that provides information, resources, and communication opportunities for persons with intellectual disabilities and other disabilities, for their families, and those that provide them with services and support at http://www.familyvillage.wisc.edu.

There are many Internet resources available and I have little room left in which to list these for you. Please know that the Greenwood Genetic Center is available and interested in receiving your questions and look forward to continuing to be a resource for you.

Study Participation

Eligible participants include individuals from birth to 60 years who have had genetic testing and have a documented molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome OR patients with a clear clinical diagnosis of Angelman syndrome who do not have a known molecular defect.

For more information, see the Angelman syndrome study fact sheet or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , study coordinator.